So many social media images to manage
According to Wikipedia there are more than 200 social media sites and each one will have a number of social media images associated with it. Each site will have its own way of allowing you set up an account, possibly with a profile. Some sites also allow you to have brand profiles in addition to your own personal one. And each site will allow you to upload one or more images, photos, icons, avatars etc., for display in different sections within the site. For example, let’s take Facebook, which has Profile Picture: 180 x 180 (Displays 160 x 160 on Desktop), Business Page Profile Picture: 180 x 180 (Displays 160 x 160 on Desktop), Cover Photo: 820 x 312, Shared Image: 1,200 x 630, Shared Link: 1,200 x 627, Highlighted Image: 1,200 x 717 (Recommended), Event Image: 1920 x 1080 (Recommended). So each image has to be the correct number of pixels wide and high and its content positioned to display properly when uploaded to the appropriate placeholder in Facebook. That’s a fair bit of work for a graphic designer. Then think of Twitter, LinkedIn, Google+, Pinterest, Instagram, … That is a HUGE amount of work and will take some serious management and possibly version control.
Keep track of your files
I suggest it is useful to adopt some sort of naming convention for your files, maybe something like this:
Filename
PROJECT-NAME-FB-0180×0180-Profile-Photo.jpg
PROJECT-NAME-FB-0820×0312-Cover-Photo.png
PROJECT-NAME-FB-1200×0630-Shared-Image-Timeline.png
PROJECT-NAME-FB-1200×0630-Shared-Image-Newsfeed.png
PROJECT-NAME-FB-1200×0627-Shared-Link-Timeline.png
PROJECT-NAME-FB-1200×0627-Shared-Link-Newsfeed.png
PROJECT-NAME-FB-1200×0717-Highlighted-Image.png
PROJECT-NAME-FB-1920×1080-Event-Image.png
where FB is the social media channel ID (Facebook in this example), and the numbers represent the image width and height in pixels, and the description speaks for itself. When you are dealing with so many images and variations, you need a way of knowing what goes where. Maybe you will use separate folders for each channel, whatever works best for you. And then of course those social media images may get updated from time to time so you need another way of keeping track of that, maybe through version control software, but simple file-naming will do although you need to consider the image references embedded in your website’s HTML code. Sprout Social have generously and very usefully published a Google spreadsheet which lists all the image sizes for a number of popular social media channels. So you may want to use one of the many online tools for producing your images such as Canva, which has pre-formatted and sized designs for use. Another brilliant tool also from Sprout is Landscape – this allows you to upload an image and resize it automatically for a number of chosen social media channels and spits out a zip file with all the images suitably named at the end – fantastic! Thank you Sprout Social! ?